Año de los testigos de Jehová sin tocar puertas • Jehovah’s Witnesses’ Year without Knocking on Doors • A Bilingual article

0
4820
It’s been one year since Jehovah’s Witnesses worldwide adjusted their hallmark methods of sharing comfort and hope from the scriptures due to the pandemic.

By Ernesto Sotomayor

It’s been one year since Jehovah’s Witnesses worldwide adjusted their hallmark methods of sharing comfort and hope from the scriptures due to the pandemic.

For many, the change from ringing doorbells and knocking on doors to making phone calls and writing letters expanded and invigorated their ministry.

“Witnesses have embraced this shift, finding the good in these trying times,” said Joseph Castano, who reports a 30 percent increase in the Witnesses’ preaching activity in his region of northern Virginia and nearby parts of West Virginia. “In fact, I hear many saying, ‘I’m able to do more now.’”

In March 2020, the some 1.3 million Witnesses in the United States suspended their door-to-door and face-to-face forms of public ministry and moved congregation meetings to videoconferencing. 

“It has been a very deliberate decision based on two principles: our respect for life and love of neighbor,” said Robert Hendriks, U.S. spokesman for Jehovah’s Witnesses. “But we are still witnesses and, as such, we must testify about our faith. So it was inevitable that we would find a way to continue our work.” 

In the bitterly cold winters of Arden Hills, Minnesota, Terri Whitmore normally bundles up for the door-to-door ministry in a long down coat and snow boots—sometimes with removable cleats to help navigate icy sidewalks. 

Now she sits at her dining room table, sips on hot tea, and calls people on her cell phone to share the same message. In December, she conducted more than twice as many Bible studies than in any prior month. “I’m having a blast,” she said. “After a nice phone call, it energizes you. You can’t wait to make the next call.” 

Her “go-to” topics for conversation with her neighbors are COVID-19, civil unrest, and government. “Some people feel like they have nothing secure to hold on to,” she said. “The power of God’s word is amazing. You can just share a scripture and you feel like they’re settling down.” 

It’s been one year since Jehovah’s Witnesses worldwide adjusted their hallmark methods of sharing comfort and hope from the scriptures due to the pandemic.

Nearly 51,000 people in the United States last year made a request for a Witness to contact them, either through a local congregation or jw.org, the organization’s official website, according to Hendriks. Since the outbreak, the Witnesses have followed up on these requests via letters and phone calls instead of in-person visits. 

“Our love for our neighbors is stronger than ever,” said Hendriks. “In fact, I think we have needed each other more than ever. We are finding that people are perplexed, stressed, and feeling isolated. Our work has helped many regain a sense of footing – even normalcy – at a very unsettled time.” 

Pascual Feliz works as a school bus driver for the Shenendehowa School District near Albany, New York. He assists his wife, Anabel, in caring for her mother Daisy who suffers with dementia. Before the pandemic, he greatly enjoyed his public ministry, and he and his wife adjusted their schedules to make sure Daisy had the care she needed. “Many times, we had to alternate,” said Pascual. “I went in the ministry and my wife stayed with her mom. Afterward, she went in the ministry and I stayed with her mom.” 

When the pandemic halted door-to-door preaching, Pascual was concerned. “In the beginning, I was a little nervous,” he said. “How would we perform our ministry?” 

Pascual said that now they’re able to enjoy preaching together as a family at home while also caring for Daisy. They have been writing letters and making telephone calls together to share encouragement from the Bible with their neighbors. “I have started some Bible studies by telephone,” he said. “Wow! We have enjoyed beautiful conversations.”

In the rural areas of Salina, Kansas, where the wheat and corn fields stretch for acres, the Milbradt family sometimes drives miles from one house to the next to reach their neighbors. Now, instead of buying gasoline to fill up their vehicle for the ministry, they spend money on paper, envelopes, stamps, and crayons.  

“We look for ways to add variety to our ministry,” said Zeb Milbradt. He and his wife, Jenny, help their boys—Colton, 8, and Benjamin, 6—write letters to children’s book authors, local police, and hospital workers. Sometimes the boys even include with the letters hand-drawn pictures of the Bible’s promise of a global paradise.

“We’ve been able to get the message to people who we wouldn’t necessarily reach otherwise,” said Jenny Milbradt. 

A letter Benjamin sent to nurses at a regional health center included a quote from the Bible’s prophecy at Isaiah 33:24 of a coming time when no one will say, “I am sick.” The center’s marketing secretary replied to Benjamin, informing him that she scanned and emailed his letter to 2,000 employees. It “made so many people smile,” she said.

Witnesses have also made a concerted effort to check on distant friends and family—sometimes texting links to Bible-based articles on jw.org that cover timely topics, such as isolation, depression, and how to beat pandemic fatigue. 

“Former Bible students have started studying again,” said Tony Fowler, who helps organize the ministry in the northern portion of Michigan’s Lower Peninsula.

It’s been one year since Jehovah’s Witnesses worldwide adjusted their hallmark methods of sharing comfort and hope from the scriptures due to the pandemic.

“Colleagues at work have now started to show interest. Some have started Bible studies with family members who showed very little interest before the pandemic.” 

Castano has been reaching out to Witnesses who had long ago stopped associating with fellow Witnesses. “The pandemic has reignited their spirituality,” he said, adding that many are attending virtual meetings with some sharing in telephone witnessing and letter writing even after decades of inactivity. “It’s been pretty outstanding,” he said.

Fowler and Castano both report about a 20 percent increase in online meeting attendance. But perhaps the most significant growth is in an area that cannot be measured by numbers. 

“I think we’ve grown as a people,” Fowler said. “We’ve grown in appreciation for other avenues of the ministry, our love for our neighbor, and love for one another. We’re a stronger people because of all of this, and that’s a beautiful thing to see.” 

For more information on the activities of Jehovah’s Witnesses, visit their website jw.org, with content available in over 1,000 languages.

U.S. Spokesman:  Robert J. Hendriks  718-560-5600  pid.us@jw.orgRegional Spokesman:  Dan Sideris  617-699-6222  dasideris@jw.org

El año de los testigos de Jehová sin tocar puertas 

Ha pasado un año desde que, debido a la pandemia, los testigos de Jehová alrededor del mundo ajustaron sus métodos característicos de compartir el consuelo y la esperanza de las Escrituras. 

Para muchos, el pasar a hacer llamadas telefónicas y escribir cartas, en lugar de tocar puertas, aumentó y dio nueva vida a su ministerio. 

“Los testigos aceptaron este cambio, encontrando lo bueno, en estos tiempos difíciles”, dijo Joseph Castano, quien reporta un aumento del 30 por ciento en la actividad de predicación de los testigos en su región del norte de Virginia y partes cercanas de Virginia Occidental. “De hecho, escucho a muchos decir: ‘Ahora puedo hacer más'”.

En marzo del 2020, los cerca de 1,3 millones de testigos en los Estados Unidos suspendieron su ministerio publico de casa en casa y de cara a cara y trasladaron las reuniones de la congregación a videoconferencia.  

“Ha sido una decisión muy deliberada basada en dos principios: nuestro respeto por la vida y el amor al prójimo”, dijo Robert Hendriks, portavoz nacional de los testigos de Jehová. Pero seguimos siendo testigos y, como tal, debemos dar testimonio acerca de nuestra fe. Así que era inevitable que encontráramos una manera de continuar nuestra labor.” 

It’s been one year since Jehovah’s Witnesses worldwide adjusted their hallmark methods of sharing comfort and hope from the scriptures due to the pandemic.

En los inviernos muy fríos de Arden Hills, Minnesota, Terri Whitmore normalmente se abriga bien para el ministerio de casa en casa con un abrigo largo y botas de nieve, a veces usando botas con clavos desmontables para caminar en aceras heladas.

Ahora se sienta en la mesa de su comedor, bebe té caliente y llama a la gente en su teléfono celular para compartir el mismo mensaje. En diciembre, condujo más del doble de cursos bíblicos que en cualquier mes anterior. “Me estoy divirtiendo”, dijo. “Después de una buena llamada, te llenas de energías. No puedes esperar hasta hacer la próxima llamada.”  

“Ha sido una decisión muy deliberada basada en dos principios: nuestro respeto por la vida y el amor al prójimo”, dijo Robert Hendriks, portavoz nacional de los testigos de Jehová. Pero seguimos siendo testigos y, como tal, debemos dar testimonio acerca de nuestra fe. Así que era inevitable que encontráramos una manera de continuar nuestra labor.” 

En los inviernos muy fríos de Arden Hills, Minnesota, Terri Whitmore normalmente se abriga bien para el ministerio de casa en casa con un abrigo largo y botas de nieve, a veces usando botas con clavos desmontables para caminar en aceras heladas.

Ahora se sienta en la mesa de su comedor, bebe té caliente y llama a la gente en su teléfono celular para compartir el mismo mensaje. En diciembre, condujo más del doble de cursos bíblicos que en cualquier mes anterior. “Me estoy divirtiendo”, dijo. “Después de una buena llamada, te llenas de energías. No puedes esperar hasta hacer la próxima llamada.”  

Sus temas “de preferencia” para conversar con sus vecinos son COVID-19, disturbios civiles y el gobierno. “Algunas personas sienten que no tienen nada seguro en que aferrarse”, dijo. “El poder de la palabra de Dios es asombroso. Puedes compartir un pasaje de las Escrituras y sentir que se están tranquilizando.”  

Cerca de 51.000 personas en los Estados Unidos solicitaron que un testigo los contactara, ya sea a través de una congregación local o por medio de jw.org, el sitio web oficial de la organización, según Hendriks. Desde el brote, los testigos han dado seguimiento a estas solicitudes a través de cartas y llamadas telefónicas en lugar de visitas en persona.

“Nuestro amor por nuestros vecinos es más fuerte que nunca”, dijo Hendriks. “De hecho, creo que nos hemos necesitado más que nunca. Estamos descubriendo que las personas están perplejas, estresadas y sintiéndose aisladas. Nuestro trabajo ha ayudado a muchos a recuperar una sensación de estabilidad, incluso la normalidad – en un momento de mucha inestabilidad”.

It’s been one year since Jehovah’s Witnesses worldwide adjusted their hallmark methods of sharing comfort and hope from the scriptures due to the pandemic.

Pascual Feliz trabaja como conductor de autobús escolar para el distrito escolar de Shenendehowa cerca de Albany, Nueva York. Ayuda a su esposa, Anabel, a cuidar de su madre, Daisy, que sufre de demencia. Antes de la pandemia, disfrutaba mucho de su ministerio público, y él y su esposa ajustaron sus horarios para asegurarse de que Daisy tuviera la atención que necesitaba. “Muchas veces tuvimos que alternar”, dijo Pascual. “Yo fui al ministerio y mi esposa se quedó con su mamá. Después, ella fue al ministerio y yo me quedé con su mamá “.

Cuando la pandemia detuvo la predicación de puerta en puerta, Pascual se preocupó. “Al principio, estaba un poco nervioso”, dijo. “¿Cómo llevaríamos a cabo nuestro ministerio?”

Pascual dijo que ahora pueden disfrutar predicando juntos como familia en casa mientras también cuidan a Daisy. Han estado escribiendo cartas y haciendo llamadas telefónicas juntos para compartir el aliento de la Biblia con sus vecinos. “He comenzado algunos estudios bíblicos por teléfono”, dijo. “¡Vaya! Hemos disfrutado de hermosas conversaciones”.  

En las zonas rurales de Salina, Kansas, donde los campos de trigo y maíz se extienden por acres, la familia Milbradt a veces conduce millas de una casa a la siguiente para llegar a sus vecinos. Ahora, en lugar de comprar gasolina para llenar su vehículo para el ministerio, usan su dinero en papel, sobres, sellos y lápices de colores.   

“Buscamos maneras de dar variedad a nuestro ministerio”, dijo Zeb Milbradt. Él y su esposa Jenny, ayudan a sus hijos Colton de 8 años y Benjamin de 6 años a escribir cartas a autores de libros infantiles, a la policía local y a los trabajadores del hospital. A veces los chicos incluso incluyen con las cartas, dibujos hechos a mano de la promesa bíblica de un paraíso.

“Hemos podido dar el mensaje a personas a las que no necesariamente llegaríamos de otra manera”, dijo Jenny Milbradt.  

Una carta que Benjamín envió a las enfermeras de un centro de salud regional incluía una cita de la profecía bíblica de Isaías 33:24 cuando en el futuro nadie dirá: “Estoy enfermo”. La secretaria de marketing del centro respondió a Benjamin, informándole que ella escaneó y envió su carta por correo electrónico a 2.000 empleados. “Hizo sonreír a tanta gente”, dijo. 

Los testigos también han hecho un esfuerzo concertado para contactar a amigos y familiares lejanos, a veces enviando enlaces por medio de mensajes de texto de artículos basados en la Biblia en jw.org que tratan temas oportunos, como el aislamiento, la depresión y cómo vencer la fatiga pandémica.

“Ex-estudiantes de la Biblia han comenzado a estudiar de nuevo”, dijo Tony Fowler, quien ayuda a organizar el ministerio en la parte norte de la Península Baja de Michigan.

“Compañeros de trabajo han comenzado a mostrar interés. Algunos han comenzado cursos bíblicos con miembros de la familia que mostraron muy poco interés antes de la pandemia”.  

Castano ha estado contactando a testigos que hace mucho tiempo habían dejado de asociarse con otros testigos. “La pandemia ha reavivado su espiritualidad”, dijo, y agregó que muchos asisten a reuniones virtuales y algunos participan en la predicación por teléfono y cartas incluso después de décadas de inactividad. “Ha sido excepcional”, dijo. 

Fowler y Castano reportan un aumento del 20 por ciento en la asistencia a las reuniones en línea. Pero quizás el crecimiento más significativo se encuentra en un área que no puede medirse por números.

“Creo que hemos crecido como pueblo”, dijo Fowler. “Hemos visto un aumento en nuestro aprecio por otras vías del ministerio, nuestro amor por el prójimo y nuestro amor mutuo. Somos un pueblo más fuerte debido a todo esto, y eso es algo hermoso de ver”.  

Para obtener más información sobre las actividades de los testigos de Jehová, visite su sitio web jw.org/es, con contenido disponible en más de 1.000 idiomas.

Portavoz Nacional: 

Robert J. Hendriks 

718-560-5600 

pid.us@jw.org

Portavoz Regional: 

Dan Sideris 

617-699-6222 

dasideris@jw.org

generac-pwrcell-banners

LEAVE A REPLY